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Republican Breakfast held PDF Print E-mail
Wednesday, 11 January 2012 16:10

Amber, ZoellerWhitley County Commissioner and Churubusco resident Don Amber, left, and Indiana Attorney General Greg Zoeller attended the Whitley County Republi-can Breakfast Saturday in Columbia City, where Zoeller was the featured speaker. (photo by allman)

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Smith Township to build new fire station PDF Print E-mail
Wednesday, 11 January 2012 16:07

New fire station(Architect drawing)

by Dave Crabill
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The Smith Township fire department will have a new home at the end of this year if all goes as planned.
According to Smith Township trustee Patty Amber, the new fire station will be built near the town park entrance at Highway 33. The official address will be 805 N. John Krieger Drive.
The township purchased the land in late 2006 for the purpose of building a future fire station. The property is currently used by the park for soccer fields.
Amber said that the new station is needed for a number of reasons. She said the current location, built over 45 years ago, is not large enough to accommodate the amount of equipment that the department has. New equipment purchases must also meet fire station door height regulations.
Amber said the current location is also tough for the firefighters to get to. “It’s difficult for the firefighters to park now,” said Amber.
Churubusco resident Lucas Konger from Vintage Archonics has been hired as the Architect/Project Manager for the project. Amber said that she will use local purchases as much as possible.
The $1.4 million building will be payed for by a combination of bonds and cumulative funds set up by the township. The township currently has roughly $300,000 in cumulative funds with remaining coming from the sales of bonds which already have been sold. The bonds have a ten year payoff schedule with an interest rate of 2 percent and ending at 3.5 percent at the ten year mark.
In the past, the Town of Churubusco contracted with Smith Township for fire protection. As of January 1, there is no contract, as all taxpayers of Smith Township and Churubusco will share equally in fire protection with the re-establishment of cumulative fire funds. The tax rate is 0.0333 cents per hundred dollars of assessed value. The taxes will reflect on the May billing.
A prevailing wage meeting was held yesterday and the opening of bids will be on February 10 at 2 p.m.
Amber also said the building will be built for future growth that includes: four drive-thru bays, meeting room, a kitchen area and the ability to house full-time EMS personnel.

by Dave Crabill

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The Smith Township fire department will have a new home at the end of this year if all goes as planned. According to Smith Township trustee Patty Amber, the new fire station will be built near the town park entrance at Highway 33. The official address will be 805 N. John Krieger Drive.

 
Influential teacher retires after 32 years of teaching PDF Print E-mail
Wednesday, 11 January 2012 16:03

Gary Smith(Gary Smith retires after 32 years teaching.) photo by wagner

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by Katie Wagner
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It’s the end of an era at Churubusco High School. When students returned to room 108 last week, a CHS mainstay was not there to greet them.
After 32 years of teaching—21 of which were spent at CHS—Gary Smith retired from his position as a social studies teacher at the end of the first semester.
Smith, a South Bend native, first taught at North Harrison High School and coached football in southern Indiana for ten years before taking a social studies position at CHS in 1989. During his time at Busco, he has taught Psychology, Sociology, U.S. History, U.S. Government, Current Problems and Law Education.
Smith graduated from Lasalle High School in South Bend, where he played football and ran track. The son of a World War II veteran, Smith then joined the United States Air Force and served for four years during Vietnam. Smith said his parents were very patriotic and often discussed politics. The excitement he witnessed during their discussions led him to pay attention and impressed in him a value for and interest in social issues. Smith then went on to graduate from Indiana University.
Smith is one of the most highly respected teachers at CHS—even by the students who usually don’t care about academics. Smith attributes his level of respect to the Golden Rule, saying that students rise to the level of expectation to which they are held.  “Kids realize someone has faith in them and it makes them work harder because they don’t want to disappoint,” he said.
Smith also enjoys joking around with students and often uses unique tactics when doling out discipline. Students who dare to fall asleep in Smith’s class are in for a rude  awakening—possibly a shaking desk, a loud noise next to their ear or waking up to the realization that the room is dark and the whole class is gone.
Smith’s animated teaching style brings concepts to life.
Terms and concepts such as Machiavelli, The Leviathan and the operational definition of government (an institution with the power to make and enforce laws), stick with students long after graduation.
A crowd favorite is Smith’s impression of a monkey grinding coffee—a Middle Eastern gesture that represents people laughing at another person’s misfortune and a concept that he taught in his Sociology classes showing differences in cultures and gestures. “That question is hardly ever missed on a test,” he said.
Although Smith appears vibrant and in charge in the classroom, he often frets about the first day of school. Word has gotten out over the years of his back-to-school ritual. At the beginning of each school year, Smith said he paces his backyard, practicing what he’ll say on the first day of school and anticipating any questions the kids might ask. He said he does it to burn off energy and anxiety.
“A teacher is an actor and is playing a role,” he said. “Some people would describe me as gregarious, but I’m actually very introverted in my private life.”
Smith said he believes in a dynamic classroom where the teacher presents the information and challenges students to think about it and critique it. He often plays the devil’s  advocate to generate discussion and debate among the kids.
“It doesn’t matter what viewpoint students have, just as long as they think critically and back up their viewpoints with reasons,” he said. “I want the kids in my class to be  exposed to as many viewpoints as possible.”
Former student and CHS class of 2000 graduate Zack Kruse said he would not be the  person that he is today without the influence of Smith.
“Mr. Smith is and was not only a great educator, but a great human being. He took my eagerness to learn and helped turn it into a near obsession,” Kruse said. “He inspired me to want to teach, he taught me the importance of critical thinking skills and I never walked away from his classroom without having learned something or been excited by the content in some way.”  “Of all of the things that he taught and encouraged within me, the critical thinking skills were, by far, the most important. Without those basic tools, I'm convinced it is impossible to be a reasonable, functioning adult--as opposed to one who is complacent, easily bamboozled and not at all curious about the world around them.” Kruse said that Smith taught him to be a confident and effective communicator.
Kruse was one of 1100 Facebook users to “like” a page dedicated to Gary Smith.
Hundreds of past students and colleagues recounted their favorite memories of Smith on the Facebook page and Smith said he has read every comment. Kirk Bradtmiller, a 2006 CHS graduate, wrote: “Mr. Smith is one of very few teachers that I have ever had that treated every single student with the same respect. He showed no bias or favoritism toward anyone at any time, didn't matter your rank in the class, your social status or anything. On top of that, he was well prepared every lecture, showed a genuine love for teaching and an appreciation for IU, which was also a plus.”
Smith said he isn’t sure what retirement will bring, but he plans to take three to four months to decompress and figure out what his next steps will be.
“I’ve had a job since I was 16 and I’m almost 60,” Smith said, “so I’ve always been busy and it will be nice to have time to read books and analyze books and TV shows.”
“I liked Churubusco right off the bat,” Smith said. “I liked the people and atmosphere and my plan is to live here for all of my life. I would like to thank the students over the years because they made life interesting.”
Smith said he isn’t ruling out a run for school board, but he isn’t committing to it either.
Every good thing must come to an end, so with a firm handshake and a pat on the back, we’ll miss ya, Buddy!

by Katie Wagner

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It’s the end of an era at Churubusco High School. When students returned to room 108 last week, a CHS mainstay was not there to greet them. 

After 32 years of teaching—21 of which were spent at CHS—Gary Smith retired from his position as a social studies teacher at the end of the first semester.

 
New Council goes to work PDF Print E-mail
Wednesday, 11 January 2012 15:55

Malcolm, Pepple(Churubusco’s new members of Town Council attended their first meeting on January 4. Alan Malcolm (left) and Mark Pepple were sworn in on January 1.) photo by crabill

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by Dave Crabill
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The Churubusco Town Council held their first meeting of 2012 on January 4.
Newly elected members Alan Malcom and Mark Pepple joined four year incumbent Frank Kessler for the bi-monthly meeting.
Kessler, Malcolm, Pepple and also newly elected Clerk-Treasurer Madalyn Sade-Bartl were sworn into office on January 1 at the Whitley County Courthouse by Judge Jim Heuer.
The group lost no time in taking care of business.
They approved the hiring of Tammy Manier as the new deputy clerk at the grade 2 pay scale of $1,362 bi-weekly salary.
Prior to hiring Manier, the Council modified a hiring and salary freeze enabling the employment of the deputy clerk.
In other Council news:
• Council representative appointments were made for the following boards: Pepple; Assigned to the membership of Region 3A and Whitley County Emergency Management, Malcolm; Solid Waste Board and Planning Commission, Kessler; Main Street Improvement Committee.
• Office hours for the Clerk’s office have changed. The hours are Monday, Tuesday, Thursday and Friday from 8 a.m. - 4:30 p.m. and Wednesday  from 8 a.m. - 6: p.m. The Clerk’s office will not close for lunch.
• Information for the community sign can be submitted at the Government Center or by calling Madalyn Sade-Bartl at 693-9350 or Jeremy Hart at 693-0551
• National Serv-All will be picking up Christmas trees on Monday, January 16. Set your trees by the curb for compost pickup.
The next regular scheduled meeting is on Wednesday, January 18 at the Town Hall.

by Dave Crabill

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The Churubusco Town Council held their first meeting of 2012 on January 4. Newly elected members Alan Malcom and Mark Pepple joined four year incumbent Frank Kessler for the bi-monthly meeting.

 
2012 Polar Plunge PDF Print E-mail
Wednesday, 04 January 2012 18:18

Polar Plunge participantsThe fifth annual Blue Lake Polar Plunge took place at 12 noon on New Year’s day on the north shore of Blue Lake.

 
Curves of Churubusco reinvents as a "Curves Complete" club PDF Print E-mail
Wednesday, 04 January 2012 18:10

Curves of Churubusco has now got it all - diet, exercise and motivation - and they’re offering a free week trial.
Losing weight isn’t easy. It takes real commitment to make the necessary changes to diet, exercise and lifestyle.  And, for most people, it takes a plan. That’s why Curves, the fitness franchise designed exclusively for women, has developed Curves Complete, a simple, easy-to-follow weight-loss plan that combines the three keys to taking off weight and keeping it off: diet, exercise and motivation.
Curves is the only place you can get all three, and Curves of Churubusco wants you to try it free for one week.
"For many women, managing the simple logistics of sticking to a diet and exercise plan is what defeats them," says Sharon Scheiber, Churubusco Curves Owner. "Meal planning and preparation, shopping, designing an effective and age-appropriate exercise plan, coping with everyday emotional highs and lows - it can be overwhelming. Sometimes it seems easier to stick with the status quo. That’s why our new Curves Complete program provides a foolproof plan for dealing with all of these diet challenges - and helps keep women on track for success."
The Curves Complete program incorporates all three key components of a successful weight management plan and is designed to help dieters lose up to 20 pounds and 20 inches in just 90 days. Women are seeing real results and sharing their success stories with others at www.facebook.com/curves.
Research shows that up to 95 percent of dieters regain their lost weight, and then some. It’s not because there’s something wrong with them, it’s because there’s something wrong with conventional weight loss plans. To lose weight and keep it off, you need three secret weapons:
· Diet: Weekly personalized diet plans and shopping lists created through the Curves Complete website, available exclusively to Curves Complete members. These tools help dieters enjoy the convenience and portion control of expensive mail-order diet food programs while shopping at their own grocery stores - and for a fraction of the cost! The plan even offers a convenient new Heat & Eat option so that dieters can include healthy frozen food choices like Lean Cuisine® and Healthy Choice® in their diet plans.
· Exercise: Workouts at Curves of Churubusco that combine metabolism-boosting cardio with strength-training and stretching while providing a continually more challenging workout experience as fitness improves.
· Motivation: Daily motivational videos produced through a partnership with the renowned Cleveland Clinic that offer advice and strategies from a panel of experts to help you make healthy choices and keep the weight off. Plus, one-on-one time with your personal coach each week to support, encourage and motivate.
"Personal coaching is the heart of the program," said Scheiber. "All Curves Complete participants receive a Health Assessment and a 15-minute, personalized, weekly coaching session with a certified Curves Coach that includes a weigh-in, progress assessment, goal review and monthly body measurements to track results. That extra accountability is very motivating, and the coaches help you develop simple, practical strategies for getting and staying on track."
For more information about Curves Complete and Curves of Churubusco’s FREE TRIAL WEEK OFFER, please call 260-693-3838. For information on Curves, please visit www.curves.com.

Curves of Churubusco has now got it all - diet, exercise and motivation - and they’re offering a free week trial.

Losing weight isn’t easy. It takes real commitment to make the necessary changes to diet, exercise and lifestyle.  And, for most people, it takes a plan. That’s why Curves, the fitness franchise designed exclusively for women, has developed Curves Complete, a simple, easy-to-follow weight-loss plan that combines the three keys to taking off weight and keeping it off: diet, exercise and motivation.

 
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